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Family Features Editorial Syndicate
5 tips for traveling with health conditions

From staycations and road trips to Caribbean getaways and coastal cruises, summertime offers the chance to escape and unwind with a much needed (and deserved) vacation. However, for people living with health conditions like heart disease or stroke, leaving home can pose special challenges.

As travel season takes shape, the experts at the American Heart Association – celebrating 100 years of lifesaving service as the world's leading nonprofit organization focused on heart and brain health for all – recommends a few important tips to ease on-the-go woes.

Velarde said that doesn't mean travel is off limits if you have a chronic health condition. A little planning and preparation can reduce stress and prepare you for your next big adventure.

 

Check in with your health care provider 

Speak with your primary care physician or specialist about your travel plans and any special considerations related to your health. He or she can offer guidance on any restrictions or precautions you should keep in mind. Carry a list of all medications, including dosages and pharmacy information. Also consider carrying a copy of key medical records and a list of phone numbers, including your doctors and emergency contacts.

 

Manage your medications 

Ensure medications are clearly labeled and that you've packed enough to last the entire trip. If you're traveling across time zones, enlist your health care provider to help adjust medication schedules. Some medications require refrigeration; research how to pack them appropriately for airport security and make sure you'll have a refrigerator in your lodging.

 

Plan for transportation

Whether you're traveling by plane, bus, train, cruise ship or other means, it's paramount to plan ahead for special medical equipment. For example, if you use a wheelchair, walker or other assistance for getting around, you may need to check in with the travel company to find out how to properly transport your devices.

 

Master the airport

During this especially busy travel season, planning ahead can make the airport experience easier. If you have a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, you may need to go through a special security screening. Walking through a crowded terminal can take its toll, so consider requesting a wheelchair or courtesy cart to get to your gate when booking your ticket.

Long flights may increase your risk for blood clots, including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Consider wearing compression socks and walk around the cabin while it's safe and allowed to help improve your circulation.

 

Know the signs

While it's always important to know the signs of heart attack, stroke or cardiac arrest, it's particularly critical while away from home. If you or someone you're with experience symptoms, call 911. Many airports even offer kiosks where you can learn Hands-Only CPR while waiting for your flight.

 

Learn more about healthy traveling at Heart.org.

Jun 06, 2024

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